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The Florida Department of Health works to protect, promote & improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county, & community efforts.

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Immunizations

Florida Department of Health Franklin County

  •  (850) 653-2111
  •  

    Fax

    (850) 653-9896
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    Mailing Address

    139 12th Street 

    Apalachicola, Florida 32320 

     

Please see the links below for a list of recommended immunizations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention based upon a person's age:


Childhood Schedule (Birth-6 years old)

Preteens and Teens Schedule (7-18 years old)

Adults Schedule (19 and Up)

Centers for Disease Control (CDC). (2013). Immunization Schedules. U.S. Government.


Why are Childhood Vaccines So Important?

  • Newborn babies are immune to many diseases because they have antibodies they got from their mothers. However, this immunity goes away during the first year of life. Also, young children do not have this "maternal immunity" against some diseases, such as whooping cough.
  • If an unvaccinated child is exposed to a disease germ, the child's body may not be strong enough to fight the disease. Before vaccines, many children died from diseases that vaccines now prevent, such as whooping cough, measles, and polio. Those same germs exist today, but because babies are now protected by vaccines, we do not see these diseases nearly as often.
  • Immunizing individual children also helps to protect the health of our community, especially those people who cannot be immunized. These include children who are too young to be vaccinated (for example, children less than a year old cannot receive the measles vaccine but can be infected by the measles virus), those who cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons (for example, children with leukemia), and those who cannot make an adequate response to vaccination.


For more information, go to www.cdc.gov